FLATT Thomas

avatar
  • Department of Biology, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Adaptation, Evo-Devo, Experimental Evolution, Genome Evolution, Genotype-Phenotype, Life History, Molecular Evolution, Phenotypic Plasticity, Population Genetics / Genomics, Quantitative Genetics
  • recommender

Thomas Flatt is Full Professor of Evolutionary Biology in the Department of Biology at the University of Fribourg. Prior to his appointment in Fribourg in 2017, he was a tenured group leader at the Institute of Population Genetics at the Vetmeduni Vienna, a faculty member of the Vienna Graduate School of Population Genetics, and a Swiss National Science Foundation Professor at the Department of Ecology and Evolution at the University of Lausanne. Flatt received his M.Sc. in population biology from the University of Basel in 1999 and his Ph.D. in 2004 from the University of Fribourg. After his Ph.D. he was a postdoctoral research fellow at Brown University (Providence, USA). In 2011 he co-edited a book on the genetic and physiological mechanisms of life-history evolution (Oxford University Press). He has served on the editorial boards of several journals including Journal of Evolutionary Biology and Evolution and is a contributing member of the Faculty of 1000. In 2012 he was a Fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin; between 2018 and 2021 he is holding a DFG Mercator Fellowship to collaborate with evolutionary biologists at the University of Münster. Since March 2018 he is also serving as the head of the CUSO inter-university doctoral program in ecology and evolution. Flatt's main research interests are the genomic basis of adaptation, life-history evolution and the evolution of aging.

3 recommendations

2016-12-19
article picture
Geographic body size variation in the periodical cicadas Magicicada: implications for life cycle divergence and local adaptation
Koyama T, Ito H, Kakishima S, Yoshimura J, Cooley JR, Simon C, Sota T
10.1111/jeb.12653

Recommended by Wolf Blanckenhorn and Thomas Flatt
Megacicadas show a temperature-mediated converse Bergmann cline in body size (larger in the warmer south) but no body size difference between 13- and 17-year species pairs

Periodical cicadas are a very prominent insect group in North America that are known for their large size, good looks, and loud sounds. However, they are probably known best to evolutionary ecologists because of their long juvenile periods of 13 or 17 years (prime numbers!), which they spend in the ground. Multiple related species living in the same area are often coordinated in emerging as adults during the same year, thereby presumably swamping any predators specialized on eating them.
Life...

More
2016-12-13
article picture
Structural genomic changes underlie alternative reproductive strategies in the ruff (Philomachus pugnax)
Lamichhaney S, Fan G, Widemo F, Gunnarsson U, Thalmann DS, Hoeppner MP, Kerje S, Gustafson U, Shi C, Zhang H, et al.
doi:10.1038/ng.3430

Recommended by Thomas Flatt and Laurent Keller
Supergene Control of a Reproductive Polymorphism

Two back-to-back papers published earlier this year in Nature Genetics provide compelling evidence for the control of a male reproductive polymorphism in a wading bird by a "supergene", a cluster of tightly linked genes [1-2]. The bird in question, the ruff (Philomachus pugnax), has a rather unusual reproductive system that consists of three distinct types of males ("reproductive morphs"): aggressive "independents" who represent the majority of males; a smaller fraction of non-territorial "sat...

More
2016-12-13
article picture
A supergene determines highly divergent male reproductive morphs in the ruff
Küpper C, Stocks M, Risse JE, dos Remedios N, Farrell LL, McRae SB, Morgan TC, Karlionova N, Pinchuk P, Verkuil YI, et al.
doi:10.1038/ng.3443

Recommended by Thomas Flatt and Laurent Keller
Supergene Control of a Reproductive Polymorphism

Two back-to-back papers published earlier this year in Nature Genetics provide compelling evidence for the control of a male reproductive polymorphism in a wading bird by a "supergene", a cluster of tightly linked genes [1-2]. The bird in question, the ruff (Philomachus pugnax), has a rather unusual reproductive system that consists of three distinct types of males ("reproductive morphs"): aggressive "independents" who represent the majority of males; a smaller fraction of non-territorial "sat...

More

0 reviews