ARROYO Juan

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  • Dept. Of Plant Biol Ecol., Univ. de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain
  • Adaptation, Evolutionary Ecology, Macroevolution, Phylogenetics / Phylogenomics, Phylogeography & Biogeography, Population Genetics / Genomics, Reproduction and Sex, Speciation, Species interactions
  • recommender

BSc Biological Sciences, Univ. of Seville (1981) PhD Biological Sciences, Univ. Seville (1985) Lecturer, Univ. Seville (1989-2006) Full Professor, Univ. Seville (2006)

2 recommendations

2019-03-28
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Ancient tropical extinctions contributed to the latitudinal diversity gradient
Andrea S. Meseguer, Fabien Condamine
https://doi.org/10.1101/236646

Recommended by Joaquín Hortal and Juan Arroyo based on reviews by Juan Arroyo, Joaquin Calatayud, Joaquín Hortal, Arne Mooers and 2 anonymous reviewers
One (more) step towards a dynamic view of the Latitudinal Diversity Gradient

The Latitudinal Diversity Gradient (LDG) has fascinated natural historians, ecologists and evolutionary biologists ever since [1] described it about 200 years ago [2]. Despite such interest, agreement on the origin and nature of this gradient has been elusive. Several tens of hypotheses and models have been put forward as explanations for the LDG [2-3], that can be grouped in ecological, evolutionary and historical explanations [4] (see also [5]). These explanations can be reduced to no less tha...

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2019-02-15
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Architectural traits constrain the evolution of unisexual flowers and sexual segregation within inflorescences: an interspecific approach
Rubén Torices, Ana Afonso, Arne A. Anderberg, José M. Gómez and Marcos Méndez
https://doi.org/10.1101/356147

Recommended by Juan Arroyo based on reviews by 3 anonymous reviewers
Sometimes, sex is in the head

Plants display an amazing diversity of reproductive strategies with and without sex. This diversity is particularly remarkable in flowering plants, as highlighted by Charles Darwin, who wrote several botanical books scrutinizing plant reproduction. One particularly influential work concerned floral variation [1]. Darwin recognized that flowers may present different forms within a single population, with or without sex specialization. The number of species concerned is small, but they display rec...

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1 review

2019-03-28
article picture
Ancient tropical extinctions contributed to the latitudinal diversity gradient
Andrea S. Meseguer, Fabien Condamine
https://doi.org/10.1101/236646

Recommended by Joaquín Hortal and Juan Arroyo based on reviews by Juan Arroyo, Joaquin Calatayud, Joaquín Hortal, Arne Mooers and 2 anonymous reviewers
One (more) step towards a dynamic view of the Latitudinal Diversity Gradient

The Latitudinal Diversity Gradient (LDG) has fascinated natural historians, ecologists and evolutionary biologists ever since [1] described it about 200 years ago [2]. Despite such interest, agreement on the origin and nature of this gradient has been elusive. Several tens of hypotheses and models have been put forward as explanations for the LDG [2-3], that can be grouped in ecological, evolutionary and historical explanations [4] (see also [5]). These explanations can be reduced to no less tha...

More