RAVIGNé Virginie

  • PVBMT, CIRAD, Saint-Pierre, Réunion, France
  • Adaptation, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Evolutionary Applications, Evolutionary Dynamics, Evolutionary Epidemiology, Evolutionary Theory, Experimental Evolution, Population Genetics / Genomics, Reproduction and Sex, Species interactions
  • recommender

I am researcher at CIRAD in PVBMT research unit in Saint-Pierre (Réunion, France). I made my PhD in Isabelle Olivieri's group at ISEM, Montpellier (France). After a post-doc in Laurent Keller's group in Lausanne (Switzerland), I became lecturer at the University of Pau (France). Since 2007 I have been working at Cirad. I use theoretical biology and population genetics to understand the propagation and success of emergent plant pathogens and bioagressors. View my publications here https://vravigne.wordpress.com/publications/

1 recommendation

2017-05-22
PREPRINT
Can Ebola Virus evolve to be less virulent in humans?
Mircea T. Sofonea, Lafi Aldakak, Luis Fernando Boullosa, Samuel Alizon
https://doi.org/10.1101/108589

Recommended by Virginie Ravigné based on reviews by François Blanquart and Virginie Ravigné
A new hypothesis to explain Ebola's high virulence

 

The tragic 2014-2016 Ebola outbreak that resulted in more than 28,000 cases and 11,000 deaths in West Africa [1] has been a surprise to the scientific community. Before 2013, the Ebola virus (EBOV) was known to produce recurrent outbreaks in remote villages near tropical rainforests in Central Africa, never exceeding a few hundred cases with very high virulence. Both EBOV’s ability to circulate for several months in large urban human populations and its important mutation rate sugges...

More

1 review

2017-05-22
PREPRINT
Can Ebola Virus evolve to be less virulent in humans?
Mircea T. Sofonea, Lafi Aldakak, Luis Fernando Boullosa, Samuel Alizon
https://doi.org/10.1101/108589

Recommended by Virginie Ravigné based on reviews by François Blanquart and Virginie Ravigné
A new hypothesis to explain Ebola's high virulence

 

The tragic 2014-2016 Ebola outbreak that resulted in more than 28,000 cases and 11,000 deaths in West Africa [1] has been a surprise to the scientific community. Before 2013, the Ebola virus (EBOV) was known to produce recurrent outbreaks in remote villages near tropical rainforests in Central Africa, never exceeding a few hundred cases with very high virulence. Both EBOV’s ability to circulate for several months in large urban human populations and its important mutation rate sugges...

More