BLANCKENHORN Wolf

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  • Invertebrate Evolutionary Ecology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
  • Adaptation, Behavior & Social Evolution, Evolutionary Ecology, Experimental Evolution, Life History, Phenotypic Plasticity, Sexual Selection, Speciation
  • recommender

Diploma 1986, Tübingen University, Germany PhD 1990, State University of New York at Albany, NY, USA Post-doctoral fellowship 1991-93 Concordia University, Montréal, Canada since 1993 Oberassistant, later Professor University of Zurich, Switzerland

2 recommendations

2018-03-19
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Natural selection on plasticity of thermal traits in a highly seasonal environment
Leonardo Bacigalupe, Juan Diego Gaitan-Espitia, Aura M Barria, Avia Gonzalez-Mendez, Manuel Ruiz-Aravena, Mark Trinder, Barry Sinervo
https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2018/03/19/191825.full.pdf

Recommended by Wolf Blanckenhorn based on reviews by Nadia Aubin-Horth, Wolf Blanckenhorn and Dries Bonte
Is thermal plasticity itself shaped by natural selection? An assessment with desert frogs

It is well known that climatic factors – most notably temperature, season length, insolation and humidity – shape the thermal niche of organisms on earth through the action of natural selection. But how is this achieved precisely? Much of thermal tolerance is actually mediated by phenotypic plasticity (as opposed to genetic adaptation). A prominent expectation is that environments with greater (daily and/or annual) thermal variability select for greater plasticity, i.e. better acclimation ca...

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2016-12-19
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Geographic body size variation in the periodical cicadas Magicicada: implications for life cycle divergence and local adaptation
Koyama T, Ito H, Kakishima S, Yoshimura J, Cooley JR, Simon C, Sota T
10.1111/jeb.12653

Recommended by Wolf Blanckenhorn and Thomas Flatt
Megacicadas show a temperature-mediated converse Bergmann cline in body size (larger in the warmer south) but no body size difference between 13- and 17-year species pairs

Periodical cicadas are a very prominent insect group in North America that are known for their large size, good looks, and loud sounds. However, they are probably known best to evolutionary ecologists because of their long juvenile periods of 13 or 17 years (prime numbers!), which they spend in the ground. Multiple related species living in the same area are often coordinated in emerging as adults during the same year, thereby presumably swamping any predators specialized on eating them.
Life...

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1 review

2018-03-19
article picture
PREPRINT
Natural selection on plasticity of thermal traits in a highly seasonal environment
Leonardo Bacigalupe, Juan Diego Gaitan-Espitia, Aura M Barria, Avia Gonzalez-Mendez, Manuel Ruiz-Aravena, Mark Trinder, Barry Sinervo
https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2018/03/19/191825.full.pdf

Recommended by Wolf Blanckenhorn based on reviews by Nadia Aubin-Horth, Wolf Blanckenhorn and Dries Bonte
Is thermal plasticity itself shaped by natural selection? An assessment with desert frogs

It is well known that climatic factors – most notably temperature, season length, insolation and humidity – shape the thermal niche of organisms on earth through the action of natural selection. But how is this achieved precisely? Much of thermal tolerance is actually mediated by phenotypic plasticity (as opposed to genetic adaptation). A prominent expectation is that environments with greater (daily and/or annual) thermal variability select for greater plasticity, i.e. better acclimation ca...

More