MEDEL Rodrigo

  • Laboratory of Evolutionary Ecology, Faculty of Science, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile
  • Adaptation, Evolutionary Applications, Evolutionary Dynamics, Evolutionary Ecology, Evolutionary Epidemiology, Evolutionary Theory, Life History, Morphological Evolution, Other, Phenotypic Plasticity, Quantitative Genetics, Sexual Selection, Speciation, Species interactions
  • recommender

MSc in Biology 1987 Catholic University of Chile PhD in Biology 1993 Catholic University of Chile Postdoc 1996-1998 University of California San Diego

I work in the evolutionary ecology of plant-animal interactions in the Chilean Mediterranean-type ecosystem. More specifically, I study the complexity of the natural selection process acting upon plant and animal phenotypes in a coevolutionary framework. I focus on mutualistic (pollination, seed dispersal) and antagonistic (parasitism, flower herbivory) interactions. An additional interest is history and philosophy of science with emphasis in ecology and evolution.

1 recommendation

2017-07-31
PREPRINT
Selection on morphological traits and fluctuating asymmetry by a fungal parasite in the yellow dung fly
Wolf U. Blanckenhorn
https://doi.org/10.1101/136325

Recommended by Rodrigo Medel based on reviews by Rodrigo Medel and 1 anonymous reviewer
Parasite-mediated selection promotes small body size in yellow dung flies

Body size has long been considered as one of the most important organismic traits influencing demographical processes, population size, and evolution of life history strategies [1, 2]. While many studies have reported a selective advantage of large body size, the forces that determine small-sized organisms are less known, and reports of negative selection coefficients on body size are almost absent at present. This lack of knowledge is unfortunate as climate change and energy demands in stressfu...

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1 review

2017-07-31
PREPRINT
Selection on morphological traits and fluctuating asymmetry by a fungal parasite in the yellow dung fly
Wolf U. Blanckenhorn
https://doi.org/10.1101/136325

Recommended by Rodrigo Medel based on reviews by Rodrigo Medel and 1 anonymous reviewer
Parasite-mediated selection promotes small body size in yellow dung flies

Body size has long been considered as one of the most important organismic traits influencing demographical processes, population size, and evolution of life history strategies [1, 2]. While many studies have reported a selective advantage of large body size, the forces that determine small-sized organisms are less known, and reports of negative selection coefficients on body size are almost absent at present. This lack of knowledge is unfortunate as climate change and energy demands in stressfu...

More