HORTAL Joaquín

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  • Department of Biogeography and Global Change, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN-CSIC), Madrid, Spain
  • Macroevolution, Other, Phylogeography & Biogeography, Species interactions
  • recommender

I am a biogeographer with broad interests in macroecology, community ecology, island biogeography, insect ecology, evolution, and biodiversity research. My main research aim is to determine why biodiversity – and in particular community structure – is geographically distributed the way it is, and to identify the processes that domain the spatial and temporal dynamics of ecological assemblages.

1 recommendation

2019-03-28
article picture
Ancient tropical extinctions contributed to the latitudinal diversity gradient
Andrea S. Meseguer, Fabien Condamine
10.1101/236646

Recommended by Joaquín Hortal and Juan Arroyo based on reviews by Juan Arroyo, Joaquin Calatayud, Joaquín Hortal, Arne Mooers and 2 anonymous reviewers
One (more) step towards a dynamic view of the Latitudinal Diversity Gradient

The Latitudinal Diversity Gradient (LDG) has fascinated natural historians, ecologists and evolutionary biologists ever since [1] described it about 200 years ago [2]. Despite such interest, agreement on the origin and nature of this gradient has been elusive. Several tens of hypotheses and models have been put forward as explanations for the LDG [2-3], that can be grouped in ecological, evolutionary and historical explanations [4] (see also [5]). These explanations can be reduced to no less tha...

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1 review

2019-03-28
article picture
Ancient tropical extinctions contributed to the latitudinal diversity gradient
Andrea S. Meseguer, Fabien Condamine
10.1101/236646

Recommended by Joaquín Hortal and Juan Arroyo based on reviews by Juan Arroyo, Joaquin Calatayud, Joaquín Hortal, Arne Mooers and 2 anonymous reviewers
One (more) step towards a dynamic view of the Latitudinal Diversity Gradient

The Latitudinal Diversity Gradient (LDG) has fascinated natural historians, ecologists and evolutionary biologists ever since [1] described it about 200 years ago [2]. Despite such interest, agreement on the origin and nature of this gradient has been elusive. Several tens of hypotheses and models have been put forward as explanations for the LDG [2-3], that can be grouped in ecological, evolutionary and historical explanations [4] (see also [5]). These explanations can be reduced to no less tha...

More