BLANQUART François

avatar
  • Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Biology, College de France / CNRS, Paris, France
  • Adaptation, Evolutionary Applications, Evolutionary Dynamics, Evolutionary Ecology, Evolutionary Epidemiology, Evolutionary Theory
  • recommender

RESEARCH POSITIONS

01/10/2017 – present CNRS researcher ("Chargé de Recherche"), Centre Interdisciplinaire de Recherche en Biologie, College de France, Paris, France.

01/06/2015 – 31/08/2017 Marie Skłodowska-Curie fellow, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, United Kingdom.

01/05/2014 – 31/05/2017 Postdoctoral Researcher, Prof. Christophe Fraser, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, United Kingdom.

01/09/2013 – 30/04/2014 Postdoctoral Researcher, Dr Thomas Bataillon, Bioinformatics Research Centre, Aarhus University, Denmark.

01/05/2013 – 31/07/2013 Visiting Researcher, Prof. Sarah P. Otto, Zoology Department, University of British Columbia, Canada.

01/02/2013 – 30/04/2013 Visiting Researcher, Dr. Olivier Tenaillon, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), (UMR-S) 1137, Paris, France.

01/09/2009 – 31/08/2013 PhD student / Teaching assistant, Dr. Sylvain Gandon, Centre d’Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive, Université Montpellier 2.

2 recommendations

2019-05-06
article picture
When sinks become sources: adaptive colonization in asexuals
Florian Lavigne, Guillaume Martin, Yoann Anciaux, Julien PapaĂŻx, Lionel Roques
10.1101/433235

Recommended by François Blanquart and Florence Débarre based on reviews by 3 anonymous reviewers
Fisher to the rescue

The ability of a population to adapt to a new niche is an important phenomenon in evolutionary biology. The colonisation of a new volcanic island by plant species; the colonisation of a host treated by antibiotics by a-resistant strain; the Ebola virus transmitting from bats to humans and spreading epidemically in Western Africa, are all examples of a population invading a new niche, adapting and eventually establishing in this new environment.

Adaptation to a new niche can be studied using s...

More
2017-05-22
article picture
Can Ebola Virus evolve to be less virulent in humans?
Mircea T. Sofonea, Lafi Aldakak, Luis Fernando Boullosa, Samuel Alizon
10.1101/108589

Recommended by Virginie Ravigné and François Blanquart based on reviews by François Blanquart and Virginie Ravigné
A new hypothesis to explain Ebola's high virulence

 

The tragic 2014-2016 Ebola outbreak that resulted in more than 28,000 cases and 11,000 deaths in West Africa [1] has been a surprise to the scientific community. Before 2013, the Ebola virus (EBOV) was known to produce recurrent outbreaks in remote villages near tropical rainforests in Central Africa, never exceeding a few hundred cases with very high virulence. Both EBOV’s ability to circulate for several months in large urban human populations and its important mutation rate sugges...

More

1 review

2017-05-22
article picture
Can Ebola Virus evolve to be less virulent in humans?
Mircea T. Sofonea, Lafi Aldakak, Luis Fernando Boullosa, Samuel Alizon
10.1101/108589

Recommended by Virginie Ravigné and François Blanquart based on reviews by François Blanquart and Virginie Ravigné
A new hypothesis to explain Ebola's high virulence

 

The tragic 2014-2016 Ebola outbreak that resulted in more than 28,000 cases and 11,000 deaths in West Africa [1] has been a surprise to the scientific community. Before 2013, the Ebola virus (EBOV) was known to produce recurrent outbreaks in remote villages near tropical rainforests in Central Africa, never exceeding a few hundred cases with very high virulence. Both EBOV’s ability to circulate for several months in large urban human populations and its important mutation rate sugges...

More