TOWNSEND Jeffrey

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  • 135 College St, Yale University, New Haven, United States of America
  • Evolutionary Applications, Evolutionary Epidemiology, Evolutionary Theory, Experimental Evolution, Expression Studies, Genome Evolution, Genotype-Phenotype, Human Evolution, Life History, Molecular Evolution, Morphological Evolution, Phenotypic Plasticity, Phylogenetics / Phylogenomics, Phylogeography & Biogeography, Population Genetics / Genomics, Quantitative Genetics, Speciation, Systematics / Taxonomy
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Professor Townsend received his Ph.D. in 2002 in organismic and evolutionary biology from Harvard University, under the advisement of Daniel Hartl. His Ph.D. was entitled "Population genetic variation in genome-wide gene expression: modeling, measurement, and analysis", and constituted the first population genetic analysis of genome-wide gene expression variation. After making use of the model budding yeast S. cerevisiae for his Ph.D. research, Dr. Townsend accepted an appointment as a Miller Fellow at the University of California-Berkeley in the Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, where he worked to develop molecular tools, techniques, and analysis methodologies for functional genomics studies with the filamentous fungal model species Neurospora crassa, co-advised by Berkeley fungal evolutionary biologist John Taylor and molecular mycologist Louise Glass. In 2004, he accepted his first appointment as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of Connecticut. In 2006 he was appointed as an Assistant Professor the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Yale University, and in 2013 he was appointed as an Associate Professor of Biostatistics in the Yale School of Public Health.

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2018-11-21
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PREPRINT
Convergent evolution as an indicator for selection during acute HIV-1 infection
Frederic Bertels, Karin J Metzner, Roland R Regoes
https://doi.org/10.1101/168260

Recommended by Guillaume Achaz based on reviews by Jeffrey Townsend and 2 anonymous reviewers
Is convergence an evidence for positive selection?

The preprint by Bertels et al. [1] reports an interesting application of the well-accepted idea that positively selected traits (here variants) can appear several times independently; think about the textbook examples of flight capacity. Hence, the authors assume that reciprocally convergence implies positive selection. The methodology becomes then, in principle, straightforward as one can simply count variants in independent datasets to detect convergent mutations.
In this preprint, the ...

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