JIGGINS Chris's profile
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JIGGINS Chris

  • Butterfly Genetics Group, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • Adaptation, Evo-Devo, Evolutionary Ecology, Genome Evolution, Genotype-Phenotype, Hybridization / Introgression, Phylogenetics / Phylogenomics, Population Genetics / Genomics, Speciation
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Educational and work
I study adaption and speciation in the Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths). In particular I am interested in studying how species converge due to mimicry, as a model for understanding the predictability of evolution, and the genetic and ecological causes of speciation. We approach this problem from a variety of perspectives ranging from the developmental biology of wing pattern specification, through genomic studies of adaptation and divergence, through to behavioural and ecological studies in the field. We have also led the development of genomics in the Lepidoptera and recently published the full genome sequence of Heliconius melpomene. In the past my group has also studied the genetic basis of insecticide resistance in the agricultural pest, diamondback moth. I am Professor of Evolutionary Biology (2014) at the University of Cambridge

Recommendation:  1

22 Mar 2022
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Substantial genetic mixing among sexual and androgenetic lineages within the clam genus Corbicula

Strange reproductive modes and population genetics

Recommended by based on reviews by Arnaud Estoup, Simon Henry Martin and 2 anonymous reviewers

There are many organisms that are asexual or have unusual modes of reproduction. One such quasi-sexual reproductive mode is androgenesis, in which the offspring, after fertilization, inherits only the entire paternal nuclear genome. The maternal genome is ditched along the way. One group of organisms which shows this mode of reproduction are clams in the genus Corbicula, some of which are androecious, while others are dioecious and sexual. The study by Vastrade et al. (2022) describes population genetic patterns in these clams, using both nuclear and mitochondrial sequence markers.

In contrast to what might be expected for an asexual lineage, there is evidence for significant genetic mixing between populations. In addition, there is high heterozygosity and evidence for polyploidy in some lineages. Overall, the picture is complicated! However, what is clear is that there is far more genetic mixing than expected. One possible mechanism by which this could occur is 'nuclear capture' where there is a mixing of maternal and paternal lineages after fertilization. This can sometimes occur as a result of hybridization between 'species', leading to further mixing of divergent lineages. Thus the group is clearly far from an ancient asexual lineage - recombination and mixing occur with some regularity.

The study also analyzed recent invasive populations in Europe and America. These had reduced genetic diversity, but also showed complex patterns of allele sharing suggesting a complex origin of the invasive lineages.

In the future, it will be exciting to apply whole genome sequencing approaches to systems such as this. There are challenges in interpreting a handful of sequenced markers especially in a system with polyploidy and considerable complexity, and whole-genome sequencing could clarify some of the outstanding questions,

Overall, this paper highlights the complex genetic patterns that can result through unusual reproductive modes, which provides a challenge for the field of population genetics and for the recognition of species boundaries. 

References

Vastrade M, Etoundi E, Bournonville T, Colinet M, Debortoli N, Hedtke SM, Nicolas E, Pigneur L-M, Virgo J, Flot J-F, Marescaux J, Doninck KV (2022) Substantial genetic mixing among sexual and androgenetic lineages within the clam genus Corbicula. bioRxiv, 590836, ver. 4 peer-reviewed and recommended by Peer Community in Evolutionary Biology. https://doi.org/10.1101/590836

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JIGGINS Chris

  • Butterfly Genetics Group, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • Adaptation, Evo-Devo, Evolutionary Ecology, Genome Evolution, Genotype-Phenotype, Hybridization / Introgression, Phylogenetics / Phylogenomics, Population Genetics / Genomics, Speciation
  • recommender

Recommendation:  1

Reviews:  0

Educational and work
I study adaption and speciation in the Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths). In particular I am interested in studying how species converge due to mimicry, as a model for understanding the predictability of evolution, and the genetic and ecological causes of speciation. We approach this problem from a variety of perspectives ranging from the developmental biology of wing pattern specification, through genomic studies of adaptation and divergence, through to behavioural and ecological studies in the field. We have also led the development of genomics in the Lepidoptera and recently published the full genome sequence of Heliconius melpomene. In the past my group has also studied the genetic basis of insecticide resistance in the agricultural pest, diamondback moth. I am Professor of Evolutionary Biology (2014) at the University of Cambridge